Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnor
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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Posts on Islam
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  1. Taylor and Francis are offering 50 free downloads of my newly published paper, ”Hong Kong Muslims on Hajj: Rhythms of the Pilgrimage 2.0 and Experiences of Spirituality Among Twenty-First Century Global Cities”. This is published in the upcoming volume of the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs.
Follow this link to get access to this new paper.
I previously posted on this research here, and for other postings on my blog regarding hajj look here.

    Taylor and Francis are offering 50 free downloads of my newly published paper, ”Hong Kong Muslims on Hajj: Rhythms of the Pilgrimage 2.0 and Experiences of Spirituality Among Twenty-First Century Global Cities”. This is published in the upcoming volume of the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs.

    Follow this link to get access to this new paper.

    I previously posted on this research here, and for other postings on my blog regarding hajj look here.

     
     
  2. "分久必合,合久必分"
    — 

    From “Romance of the Three Kingdoms”.

    Earlier this year a student used this phrase in a paper to distinguish a point I had made in class regarding Lefebvre’s Rhythmanalysis. The discussion was on the issue of globalisation and how different eras of globalisation can be understood in a rhythmanalysis of international engagement and disengagement.

    The text is translated roughly as follows…

    分久必合,合久必分

    Kingdoms long divided must come together, Kingdoms long together must divide.

    These words are part of the opening to the classic Chinese novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms and the words are attributed to the 17th Century editor Mao Zonggang.

    It is a poetic way to consider rhytmanalysis, which itself recognises the patterns, disruptions, continuities and discontinuities that affect both our physical and social lives.

     
     
  3. As a skateboarder and an academic working on skateboard ethnography, this old excerpt from Powell Peralta’s Public Domain (1988) is poignant. I remember watching this as a teenager with friends and being amused at the attempt to try and intellectualise skateboarding. The piece is intentionally done in jest, and is typical of Peralta’s flamboyant videos of the time. 

    I read this parody as a preterition, highlighting something by omitting it. It both introduces an academic interest in skateboarding, but by turning it into a joke it rejects its. It makes fun of the suggestion that skateboarding has mores and social structure, a relationship with the city, but at the same time it celebrates such ideas. 

    Currently I am placing skate culture in a reading of social theory that touches on Bourdieu, de Certeau, and Lefebvre. What seems absurd in doing so is the disconnection between the playful, almost pointless pursuit of skateboarding, and the recognition that it has a much more intense meaning. Skate culture and its guarded authenticity is a subject most worthy of this sort of academic scrutiny, not least because it has sophisticated methods for self-refelction and adaptation whilst remaining void of a rulebook and a dominant controlling institution.

     
     
  4. thoughtsfromanisland:

Hong Kong Bills

    thoughtsfromanisland:

    Hong Kong Bills

     
     
  5. This June I was fortunate enough to participate in the Brown University International Advanced Research Institute on Ethnic Conflict and Inequality. This was a unique event that brought together a variety of academics from Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas to engage with debate and discussion with a host of visiting faculty at Brown’s Watson Institute for International Studies.

    Our convenors for the institute were Professor Ashutosh Varshney and Professor Glenn Loury. They shared their own expertise and were superb and generous hosts throughout. Professor Loury’s research on race stigma and incarceration in the United States was one of the highlights of the event. For my own research and teaching on ethnicity I found enormous value in the research that was presented. I recommend Loury’s Race, Incarceration, and American Valueswhich is a complimentary piece to Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow.

     
     
  6. This development seems to have been in the pipeline for a while. Anti-discrimination laws are set to address the status of same-sex partnerships as having legal grounding, but not a move to legalise same-sex marriage. Also wording regarding citizenship seems to address the tension between Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong Chinese relations. This law will have to be enacted with parity and address misgivings and discrimination on both sides.

    Absent from the proposal is the recognition of religious discrimination, which has in many ways served as a proxy for racial discrimination. It is on this issue, that the louder noise of Hong Konger and Mainlander tensions serves to marginalise the peripheral position of ethnic minorities in the territory.

     
     
  7. One of the really eye catching projects of skateboard philanthropy in recent years, is that of Skateistan. This remarkable NGO is an amazing vehicle for the promotion of skateboarding in Afghanistan, but it is also one of the most profoundly successful NGOs in Afghanistan. It has had huge success.

    There is plenty of information about on the project and I have posted on it twice before. However, today I am posting about the amazing book that the project has published. It is full of excellent photographs, and inspiring text. We get to hear the stories of the skaters, the volunteers, and insights into everyday life in Afghanistan.

    Highly recommended.

     
     
  8. Remarkable scenes in Hong Kong today as people march for democracy. Today is the 17th anniversary of the handover of Hong Kong back to Chinese rule.

    Photo credit to twitter.com/frostyhk

    For more news see the SCMP and follow #july1hk on twitter.

     
     
  9. More skateboard philanthropy. Hong Kong Board Rescue is asking people to donate old boards, wheels, and even bolts to help kids who can’t afford or get access to a board the chance to get skateboarding.

    This Saturday at Tseung Kwan O skatepark it will be Hong Kong’s ‘Go Skateboarding Day’ celebration. There people can also donate their old hardware.

    本星期六(6月28日)的香港滑板日於將軍澳滑板場內將設有舊滑板回收收集箱,
    請把你們用舊了的滑板或滑板配件帶到將軍澳滑板場捐贈給HK Board Rescue,
    我們會把滑板維修後轉贈給沒有能力購買滑板的朋友。
    現在我們有康民處管轄的免費極限運動場,但仍有人因各種原因而不能擁有自己的滑
    板,
    希望這一個小小的動作能帶給其他人玩滑板並非做壞事的訊息並能給他們玩滑板的機
    會。

     
     
  10. Hong Kong textbooks contain negative stereotypes on cultures and religions, researcher warns
The SCMP talks to Dr Liz Jackson at HKU about her research on representations of religious and ethnic minorities in Hong Kong school text books.
Great job Liz, bang up to date research addressing key issues in Hong Kong right now.

    Hong Kong textbooks contain negative stereotypes on cultures and religions, researcher warns

    The SCMP talks to Dr Liz Jackson at HKU about her research on representations of religious and ethnic minorities in Hong Kong school text books.

    Great job Liz, bang up to date research addressing key issues in Hong Kong right now.