Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnorFollow me on Academia.edu
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

pages

My Publications
What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
Posts on Hong Kong
Posts on Islam
Posts on Skateboarding

tumblinks

search

free counters
Free counters

powered by tumblr
seattle theme by parker ehret

  1. This Friday Professor Liz Jackson at HKU will be having a book launch for her new monograph “Muslims and Islam in U.S. Education”. It is a free event and all are welcome.
19th Sept.
12:30-14:00
Room 408-410 Meng Wah Comple, HKU

    This Friday Professor Liz Jackson at HKU will be having a book launch for her new monograph “Muslims and Islam in U.S. Education”. It is a free event and all are welcome.

    19th Sept.

    12:30-14:00

    Room 408-410 Meng Wah Comple, HKU

     
     
  2. Skateboarding as a Culture: Skatepark Etiquette

    There is increasing recognition of skateboarding as a culture and part of this popular recognition comes from the construction and use of skateparks. The designed exclusion of skateboarders from the city has been matched with the provision of specifically made places to skate, these being ‘skateparks’. In may ways skateparks are a boon for skateboarders as they are a pre-planned legitimate place to skateboard. However, skateparks come with a legion of problems that in some ways may be regarded as trivial, but these can also inform us about the perseverance of skateboard culture.

    Much of the accrued knowledge that skateboarders possess about skateboarding is contingent. It is gathered through participation and in an informal manner. Rules about behaviour are thus learnt in practice with peers. Perhaps the most important rule about skating with others relates to watching and understanding when to take turns, recognising where people are skating and how not to obstruct their ‘line’. The worst offence being ‘snaking’ taking a turn out of order, or just as someone else is about to drop in or take a run.

    The popularity of skateparks and a growth in the number of skateboarders has left many lamenting the lack of knowledge about skatepark etiquette. So much so, that now there are a variety of codes published online to inform the masses.

    There first one I offer is a design from James Jarvis that details how to keep  your park in order. 

    image

    The next comes from the Ride YouTube channel and Spencer Nuzzi tells us the unspoken rules.

    An even more irreverent and comic take is given by Jenken Magazine who detail the '7 types of people you will encounter at any skatepark”. This highlights again a concern about unwritten rules in the park. A recent instagram from Thrasher Magazine took issue with the popularity of headphones at skatespots. It has over 27,000 likes, but clearly there are some detractors from this opinion.

    image

    So, the increased popularity of the skatepark, and the concentration of skateboarders into one designated area, has resulted in new frustrations. But it has also resulted in the writing, videoing, and dissemination of the previously unwritten rules. This is making skateboarding arguably more rule oriented which it has long resisted. More some fear like a traditional sport.

    This weekend at Hong Kong’s TKO skatepark I was alarmed to see that the gate to the park was padlocked during opening hours. The security guard had to unlock the gate to allow users access and then again lock them in. This was all in a effort to police only entrants who had helmets. It was not successful. It did however provide a very clear example of the the idea of the skatepark as a designated space, or as referred to in this interview “a skate prison”. Part of the recent concern in Hong Kong about the new rules of the bigger skateparks is that they are taking away the control skateboarders have over their own activities, or their own culture.

    Next time you pass a skatepark, note how the rules signposted at the park differ from the rules noted in the links in this post. Questions that emerge are whose space is the skatepark, and who speaks for skateboarders?

     
     
  3. Some thoughts here from Daniel Goldstein on the status of illegal persons and a timely muse on civil disobedience. The argument here is that actions, not people, are illegal. I also have included the map of global incarceration figures that is included in the article.

    “No human being is illegal,” reads a t-shirt slogan popular among those working for immigration reform. From a humanist or activist perspective the statement is clearly true. Our basic shared humanity should trump any politics, and laws that divide us on the basis of citizenship or race or identity are unjust. The t-shirt—like this piece I am writing—is meant as a provocation, encouraging us to question some of our assumptions. I suspect most anthropologists would agree with the sentiment it expresses.1

     
     
  4. Urban Renewal and Play Spaces - Skatepark in Cape Town

    In April this year, the international PLAYscapes competition sought to find which world city is the most fun – London, New York City, Buenos Aires, Bangkok, Moscow, or Cape Town. To answer the question, they asked professional and student architects as well as designers from cities around the world to propose ideas which encouraged public interaction and turned redundant city spaces into fun creative places or transformed a neglected forgotten part of the city into a fun ‘playscape’. The competition aimed to encourage and reward design excellence at a small scale which integrates function, structure, details and the needs of those living in urban areas. Over 500 registered entrants took part and the jury panel included representatives from Building Trust International, Project for Public Spaces, BMW Guggenheim Lab, Landscape Architects Network, 3Space, Neon Stash, Land8 as well as academics and professionals from the fields of architecture and landscape design.

    The City of Cape Town proudly submitted the Gardens Skate Park design to the competition in order to show how creatively we can transform negative space in our city into a fun place with opportunities for interaction and play.

    Follow the link

     
     
  5. everydayhybridity:

The Department of Anthropology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, invites graduate students in Asia and elsewhere to present their current research at our 7th Postgraduate Student Forum: “Impacting the World: The Emerging Voices of Asian Anthropology”. The Forum, to be held 23-24 January 2015 (Friday and Saturday) at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, will showcase the best of students’ contemporary research on Asia. Hong Kong is a global city, a major node for trade, investment, and the exchange of ideas. The Postgraduate Student Forum seeks to encourage the communication among young anthropologists in and of the East and Southeast Asian region, to help improve their research and to make the excellent research being conducted in Asia to be better known internationally. 
Presentations and Panels
We accept proposals for individual papers ONLY this year. Papers of different topics are welcome, ethnographic work preferred. Papers will then be organized into panels. Each paper presentation will last 15 minutes; PowerPoint and multimedia equipment will be provided. The language of the forum will be English. 
How to Apply
Application procedure and additional information can be found athttp://www.cuhk.edu.hk/ant/pgforum7/index.html Deadline for abstracts is 30 September 2014.   
Forum Dates 
23-24 January 2015 (Friday and Saturday)  For additional information, visit http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/ant/pgforum7/index.html or email anthforum@cuhk.edu.hk telephone: +852 3943 7670

    everydayhybridity:

    The Department of Anthropology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, invites graduate students in Asia and elsewhere to present their current research at our 7th Postgraduate Student Forum: “Impacting the World: The Emerging Voices of Asian Anthropology”. The Forum, to be held 23-24 January 2015 (Friday and Saturday) at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, will showcase the best of students’ contemporary research on Asia. 

    Hong Kong is a global city, a major node for trade, investment, and the exchange of ideas. The Postgraduate Student Forum seeks to encourage the communication among young anthropologists in and of the East and Southeast Asian region, to help improve their research and to make the excellent research being conducted in Asia to be better known internationally. 

    Presentations and Panels

    We accept proposals for individual papers ONLY this year. Papers of different topics are welcome, ethnographic work preferred. Papers will then be organized into panels. Each paper presentation will last 15 minutes; PowerPoint and multimedia equipment will be provided. The language of the forum will be English. 

    How to Apply

    Application procedure and additional information can be found athttp://www.cuhk.edu.hk/ant/pgforum7/index.html 
    Deadline for abstracts is 30 September 2014
      

    Forum Dates 

    23-24 January 2015 (Friday and Saturday)  


    For additional information, 
    visit http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/ant/pgforum7/index.html or 
    email anthforum@cuhk.edu.hk 
    telephone: +852 3943 7670

     
     
  6.  
     
  7. A great info graphic on Drone attacks in Paksitan from Zeeshan Usmani.

    A great info graphic on Drone attacks in Paksitan from Zeeshan Usmani.

     
     
  8. "If there are connections everywhere, why do we persist in turning dynamic, interconnected phenomena into static, disconnected things?"
    — 

    Eric Wolf - Europe and the People Without History. pg 4

    Revisiting this text for next week’s Globalization class. So many great and powerful points within the first few pages.

     
     
  9. Here is a good overview of recent political developments in Hong Kong. Lots going on with occupy central and the debate and decision on universal suffrage in 2017.

     
     
  10. The Avenue of Stars - Selfie - and Posing with Bruce.

    There are a collection of photos doing the rounds by Luisa Dörr and Navin Kala  that capture various people taking selfies on Hong Kong’s ‘Avenue of Stars’.

    The photos are great but I immediately thought of the paper a student turned in for me over a year ago when I taught Anthropology of the Body. She had camped out by the Bruce Lee statue on the ‘Avenue of Stars’ and observed and analysed the ways in which people would take photos at the iconic landmark.

    In her thought provoking research she  noted the propensity for people strike a Kung Fu pose, or to try and touch or climb on the statue itself. Seldom was there a sombre and uninspired pose. She noted in particular the change that people would encounter as they approached and then engaged with the statue. The passing of a camera to a friend, the spontaneous emulation of the legendary actor.

    The selfie is certainly a big feature of the ‘Avenue of Stars’, but the full body pose, captured by friends or passers by is notable feature of the Bruce Lee statue.