Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

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cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnor
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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  1. So the Pew Research Centre has a new report on 'The Rise of Asian Americans', which includes this interactive map above. This highlights the distribution of different asian ethnicity across America.
It is a curious report as appears to be talking about Asian Americans as one cohesive group. It talks of how they are the most successful, content, and stable, minority group in the US. However it then goes on to break down the Asian American category by looking at the different ethnic backgrounds.
There are some interesting points. Japanese Americans are 73% US born for example, the largest group of American born Asians.
The religious demographics are also interesting from my point of view.

The religious identities of Asian Americans are quite varied. According to the Pew Research survey, about half of Chinese are unaffiliated, most Filipinos are Catholic, about half of Indians are Hindu, most Koreans are Protestant and a plurality of Vietnamese are Buddhist. Among Japanese Americans, no one group is dominant: 38% are Christian, 32% are unaffiliated and 25% are Buddhist. In total, 26% of Asian Americans are unaffiliated, 22% are Protestant (13% evangelical; 9% mainline), 19% are Catholic, 14% are Buddhist, 10% are Hindu, 4% are Muslim and 1% are Sikh. Overall, 39% of Asian Americans say religion is very important in their lives, compared with 58% of the U.S. general public.

Asian Americans find religion less important than the rest of the general US population.

Despite high levels of residential integration and out-marriage, many Asian Americans continue to feel a degree of cultural separation from other Americans. Not surprisingly, these feelings are highly correlated with nativity and duration of time in the U.S.
Among U.S.-born Asian Americans, about two-thirds (65%) say they feel like “a typical American.” Among immigrants, just 30% say the same, and this figure falls to 22% among immigrants who have arrived since 2000.

    So the Pew Research Centre has a new report on 'The Rise of Asian Americans', which includes this interactive map above. This highlights the distribution of different asian ethnicity across America.

    It is a curious report as appears to be talking about Asian Americans as one cohesive group. It talks of how they are the most successful, content, and stable, minority group in the US. However it then goes on to break down the Asian American category by looking at the different ethnic backgrounds.

    There are some interesting points. Japanese Americans are 73% US born for example, the largest group of American born Asians.

    The religious demographics are also interesting from my point of view.

    The religious identities of Asian Americans are quite varied. According to the Pew Research survey, about half of Chinese are unaffiliated, most Filipinos are Catholic, about half of Indians are Hindu, most Koreans are Protestant and a plurality of Vietnamese are Buddhist. Among Japanese Americans, no one group is dominant: 38% are Christian, 32% are unaffiliated and 25% are Buddhist. In total, 26% of Asian Americans are unaffiliated, 22% are Protestant (13% evangelical; 9% mainline), 19% are Catholic, 14% are Buddhist, 10% are Hindu, 4% are Muslim and 1% are Sikh. Overall, 39% of Asian Americans say religion is very important in their lives, compared with 58% of the U.S. general public.

    Asian Americans find religion less important than the rest of the general US population.

    Despite high levels of residential integration and out-marriage, many Asian Americans continue to feel a degree of cultural separation from other Americans. Not surprisingly, these feelings are highly correlated with nativity and duration of time in the U.S.

    Among U.S.-born Asian Americans, about two-thirds (65%) say they feel like “a typical American.” Among immigrants, just 30% say the same, and this figure falls to 22% among immigrants who have arrived since 2000.

     
     
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