Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnorFollow me on Academia.edu
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
Posts on Hong Kong
Posts on Islam
Posts on Skateboarding

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  1. I have another endorsement for my book from acclaimed youth scholar Anita Harris.
Her 2004 book Future Girl is an excellent and timely text. She looks at the new status of young femininity and the ubiquitous position of young women as champions of popular culture, business, and their own self determination. The text shows how much of the ‘new girl’ ideology of the 21st Century is a veneer that hides long standing power dynamics. The women who are on top, are in most cases those that were always going to be on top. Much of their new success is built on selling this new message to scores of young women who are in many senses less well positioned, less able to succeed, and at much more risk. It is an excellent book that should be widely read.
Harris also has a new book Young People and Everyday Multiculturalism that will be out later this year. There are of course many parallels between everyday multiculturalism and everyday hybridity. The former is engaged in revealing how multiculturalism is actually lived rather than how it is more popularly considered as a policy and ethic in political culture. Everyday hybridity on the other hand has been focal in providing empirical accounts of cultural hybridity and presenting the dismissed un-exotic, less celebrated face of difference. This new release from Harris promises to be an insightful read.
I am very honoured to have the words of support from Anita Harris on my forthcoming book Islam in Hong Kong: Muslims and Everyday Life in China’s World City.

In this insightful and fascinating book, O’Connor walks us through the bustling streets of Hong Kong where space, civility, hope and freedom are created every day by the territory’s diverse Muslims. It provides a rare glimpse into an imperfect, but perhaps ‘good enough’ cosmopolitanism, lived in the schools, homes, shops and lives of ordinary people. Amidst the worry and panic about young Muslims in diaspora as either problems or victims, this is a refreshing and much-needed account of the valuable ways a global city deals with difference. An essential text for scholars and students of youth, diversity and contemporary multiculturalism.

    I have another endorsement for my book from acclaimed youth scholar Anita Harris.

    Her 2004 book Future Girl is an excellent and timely text. She looks at the new status of young femininity and the ubiquitous position of young women as champions of popular culture, business, and their own self determination. The text shows how much of the ‘new girl’ ideology of the 21st Century is a veneer that hides long standing power dynamics. The women who are on top, are in most cases those that were always going to be on top. Much of their new success is built on selling this new message to scores of young women who are in many senses less well positioned, less able to succeed, and at much more risk. It is an excellent book that should be widely read.

    Harris also has a new book Young People and Everyday Multiculturalism that will be out later this year. There are of course many parallels between everyday multiculturalism and everyday hybridity. The former is engaged in revealing how multiculturalism is actually lived rather than how it is more popularly considered as a policy and ethic in political culture. Everyday hybridity on the other hand has been focal in providing empirical accounts of cultural hybridity and presenting the dismissed un-exotic, less celebrated face of difference. This new release from Harris promises to be an insightful read.

    I am very honoured to have the words of support from Anita Harris on my forthcoming book Islam in Hong Kong: Muslims and Everyday Life in China’s World City.

    In this insightful and fascinating book, O’Connor walks us through the bustling streets of Hong Kong where space, civility, hope and freedom are created every day by the territory’s diverse Muslims. It provides a rare glimpse into an imperfect, but perhaps ‘good enough’ cosmopolitanism, lived in the schools, homes, shops and lives of ordinary people. Amidst the worry and panic about young Muslims in diaspora as either problems or victims, this is a refreshing and much-needed account of the valuable ways a global city deals with difference. An essential text for scholars and students of youth, diversity and contemporary multiculturalism.