Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnor
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

pages

My Publications
What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
Posts on Hong Kong
Posts on Islam
Posts on Skateboarding

tumblinks

search

free counters
Free counters

powered by tumblr
seattle theme by parker ehret

  1. shortell:

Now available! I’m very excited about this book. Really interesting work by a diverse group of urbanists.
www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781472416162

This looks great!

    shortell:

    Now available! I’m very excited about this book. Really interesting work by a diverse group of urbanists.

    www.ashgate.com/isbn/9781472416162

    This looks great!

     
     
  2. Classic Albums, Paintings of London, and Paintings of World Cities  Through Google Street View - The Guardian

    This provides a rather unique way to look at how places change, and to imagine iconic images in their contemporary everyday surroundings.

     
     
  3. descrofton:

    Indonesian sorceress holds an exorcism in Causeway Bay, Hong Kong Island

    Some really fantastic street photography from Des Crofton. Checkout the blog, gaze at some everyday life in Hong Kong, follow the blog.

     
     
  4. jeremynix:

People in Cars

I have an on going “project” capturing images of people from the passenger seat of any car I am…

View Post

Great project. It is exactly the sort of mundane stuff that we are accustomed too that makes such an interesting collection of pictures. One can joke about it, but people do glance at each other, from one car to another, especially when the vehicles come to rest. It also reminds me of this new book by Iain Borden - Drive, which is on my reading list but haven’t yet got too.
This also connects with a mini project I have collecting people’s stories about commuting to work, college, dropping kids off to school etc. I want to know more about these rhythms and how people regard their commute.
If anyone wants to share their commuting experience, message me here, or email everydayhybridity@gmail.com.

    jeremynix:

    People in Cars

    I have an on going “project” capturing images of people from the passenger seat of any car I am…

    View Post

    Great project. It is exactly the sort of mundane stuff that we are accustomed too that makes such an interesting collection of pictures. One can joke about it, but people do glance at each other, from one car to another, especially when the vehicles come to rest. It also reminds me of this new book by Iain Borden - Drive, which is on my reading list but haven’t yet got too.

    This also connects with a mini project I have collecting people’s stories about commuting to work, college, dropping kids off to school etc. I want to know more about these rhythms and how people regard their commute.

    If anyone wants to share their commuting experience, message me here, or email everydayhybridity@gmail.com.

     
     
  5. "The impact of technological conquests does not make the everyday any more alive; it nourishes ideology."
    — 

    Rhythmanalysis - Henri Lefebvre - pg 54

    This is a brief quote appears in a section of Rhythmanalysis in which Lefebvre is dealing with capitalism. He argues that ‘technologies kill immediacy’, which is now quite a difficult notion to support. The book was first published in 1992 and in that short time technology has totally transformed everyday life, his great and enduring passion. Indeed the immediacy of technological communication across the globe makes the assertion sound most dated. Yet what follows after it is the quote I include above.

    This has a more enduring truth. The staunchest advocate of technologies and virtual reality would be troubled to challenge this. I for one agree, technology does not make the everyday more alive. The immediacy of communication, of our ease in texting or skyping distant people is burdened the constant need to conform to the mundane rhythms of typing in passwords, swiping screens, and pressing buttons. CGI in movies, pioneered on a big scale memorably byJurassic Park, now only makes films seem more false. Whilst it may be immediate the mediated technology is constantly creating barriers. Perhaps he would argue creating arrhythmia with our more (dare I say natural) rhythms, the immediacy of our ways of working together.

    For Lefebvre all technology nourishes ideology and that ideology in this case it that of the market. Growing up at a time where there was no ‘google’ means that I have seen how the optimism of the web very quickly turned into the simple pursuit of how to make money out of the web. What we have turned online communication and network technology into is only that which personifies our era, our ideology. 

    How can technology make us feel more alive? Future schemes like a realistic google nose? Engaging deeper sensory experience in technology is indeed an aspect of the huge potential of technology to not just keep us feeling alive, but to even enhance such experiences. To do justice to Lefebvre’s short discussion, the fault is not in the technology, but the way in which it is co-opted. Guarded, commoditised, and patented. technology is simply just another tool, in Lefebvre’s marxist critique there is perhaps a fondness for a bygone era, but an ignorance too about how technology has in different forms been part of human history.

    Rhythmanalysis is brief but it contains much of interest for social theory. Chapter 3 is particularly useful and accessible to students of urbanism and social geography. It is also very much a companion piece to de Certeau’s walking in the city, with Lefebvre looking out of a Parisian window. I think all 'great' cities should have this sort of meandering evocative writing produced about them.

    Personally I think that the richest elements of the text (and de Certeau’s the practice of everyday life too) exist in the less well-known passages. There is much here waiting to be dusted off and set in place to new trajectories of thought.

     
     
  6. Street scenes from driving around Hung Hom on a rainy lunchtime

     
     
  7. One set of stories I have collected, or have been attentive to listen to and remember, are those of the commutes that people make to work. From an everyday life perspective these routines are both mundane and in essence repetitively uniform. However, the manner in which people approach them and talk about them is often remarkable. We see a variety of tactics, spatial analysis, and personal creativity infused with the commute.
A recent posting I made responded to the rather reduced notion of commuting reported in the UK census. It provided a un-dynamic idea of the commute. Not providing ways for us to consider that many people utilised multiple transports to get to work.
In Hong Kong people might go bus, tram, MTR. Or various other combinations including a good spell walking. I think the world needs an exegesis on the everyday nature of the commute in Hong Kong. One that engages with the human aspect rather than the statistical. 
This is research I am developing.
It also takes me to make reference to Iain Borden’s new book 'Drive' which looks particularly at the culture of motorway driving and its integration with moving through a landscape. I think mine is in the post.

    One set of stories I have collected, or have been attentive to listen to and remember, are those of the commutes that people make to work. From an everyday life perspective these routines are both mundane and in essence repetitively uniform. However, the manner in which people approach them and talk about them is often remarkable. We see a variety of tactics, spatial analysis, and personal creativity infused with the commute.

    A recent posting I made responded to the rather reduced notion of commuting reported in the UK census. It provided a un-dynamic idea of the commute. Not providing ways for us to consider that many people utilised multiple transports to get to work.

    In Hong Kong people might go bus, tram, MTR. Or various other combinations including a good spell walking. I think the world needs an exegesis on the everyday nature of the commute in Hong Kong. One that engages with the human aspect rather than the statistical. 

    This is research I am developing.

    It also takes me to make reference to Iain Borden’s new book 'Drive' which looks particularly at the culture of motorway driving and its integration with moving through a landscape. I think mine is in the post.

     
     
  8. bermudianabroad:

    carlosesoto:

    mrsgoldfrond:

    Cramped Apartments in Hong Kong Shot From Above

    In an effort to raise awareness of the unseemly living conditions in Hong Kong, these cramped apartments in Hong Kong by photographer Benny Lam are shot from above to show the reality of workers in this metropolis. If you thought your dorm or apartment in New York were small, you may be a bit more appreciative after sifting through these cramped apartments in Hong Kong.

    Cramped Hong Kong Living

    There’s not much for me to add to this. Just let the pictures speak for themselves.

    Great shots

     
     
  9. Great tumblr blog here called students portraits. It provides a series of pictures of students from different countries and their living spaces. More precisely their student rooms, digs, study spaces etc. I remember being in halls and documenting my room. I still have the photo somewhere and it really captures a moment in time. It is a simple photo of the room, no-one present, but it is evocative of all the time I spent there studying, writing, hanging out with friends, oversleeping, recovering from the flu…

     
     
  10. This looks good!
I shall be seeking this out one day soon.
humanscalecities:


Everyday Urbanism

    This looks good!

    I shall be seeking this out one day soon.

    humanscalecities:

    Everyday Urbanism