Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnorFollow me on Academia.edu
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

pages

My Publications
What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
Posts on Hong Kong
Posts on Islam
Posts on Skateboarding

tumblinks

search

free counters
Free counters

powered by tumblr
seattle theme by parker ehret

  1. Here is a good overview of recent political developments in Hong Kong. Lots going on with occupy central and the debate and decision on universal suffrage in 2017.

     
     
  2. The Avenue of Stars - Selfie - and Posing with Bruce.

    There are a collection of photos doing the rounds by Luisa Dörr and Navin Kala  that capture various people taking selfies on Hong Kong’s ‘Avenue of Stars’.

    The photos are great but I immediately thought of the paper a student turned in for me over a year ago when I taught Anthropology of the Body. She had camped out by the Bruce Lee statue on the ‘Avenue of Stars’ and observed and analysed the ways in which people would take photos at the iconic landmark.

    In her thought provoking research she  noted the propensity for people strike a Kung Fu pose, or to try and touch or climb on the statue itself. Seldom was there a sombre and uninspired pose. She noted in particular the change that people would encounter as they approached and then engaged with the statue. The passing of a camera to a friend, the spontaneous emulation of the legendary actor.

    The selfie is certainly a big feature of the ‘Avenue of Stars’, but the full body pose, captured by friends or passers by is notable feature of the Bruce Lee statue.

     
     
  3. Skateboarding in Hong Kong - Helmets and the LCSD
Yesterday Warren Stuart and I were on RTHK Radio 3 discussing Skateboard Culture in Hong Kong and the new rules at 4 public skateparks in the territory that make wearing helmets mandatory. You can listen to the interview here.
There has been a number of issues with these rules. In many cases they have been ignored or rejected by users who are circumventing the new policy in a variety of ways. There has also been a noted decline in the number of users in some skateparks in the territory. In one case the Lai Chi Kok skatepark that has been open for 13 years without the enforcement of any helmet rule has basically become empty.
The introduction of the rule raises a considerable number of issues.
A large amount of public money has been spent on construction of these skateparks. They have been built for the community and are free to use. At the same time they provide an alternative to the street which can be a dangerous and problematic place for skateboarders to use. The street is also an uncontrolled environment for younger teenagers. With the introduction of unpopular rules skateboarders are eschewing the skateparks for the streets
Safety issues. In many ways helmets are regarded as a much safer option for skateboarders, BMX, and rollerbladers. However, part of skateboard culture rejects rules such as these. Skateboarders for example may not wear a helmet when they are skating ledges and small transitions but will choose to wear a helmet when skate larger vert obstacles. The imposition of rules my non-skaters has always been met with suspicion by skateboarders. A key part of skate culture is that skateboarders try and manage and control it.
Park usage. There are 2 new skateparks that have big bowls that take up roughly a quarter of the total park size. However these have never been open to the public. Even with the introduction of the new helmet rule the large bowls remain closed unless an organisation books them for an event. Then only members of that organisation can officially use the booked bowl. One has to question how skateboarders in Hong Kong can ever acquire the skills to ride these bowls in such situations.
The previous policy of the parks that required users to sign in and provide a waver had no issues. This method also provided the LCSD with data on how many users accessed the park, their ages, and genders. In sum an excellent tool to see who the parks are servicing. Since the introduction of the helmet rule no further data on numbers of users is being collected and they therefore have no firm numbers about the effect of the new policy.
Many are in favour of a reversion to the previous arrangement. In this way helmet use was optional, but recommended and users could sign themselves in. It remains to be seen how things will develop from this point on.

    Skateboarding in Hong Kong - Helmets and the LCSD

    Yesterday Warren Stuart and I were on RTHK Radio 3 discussing Skateboard Culture in Hong Kong and the new rules at 4 public skateparks in the territory that make wearing helmets mandatory. You can listen to the interview here.

    There has been a number of issues with these rules. In many cases they have been ignored or rejected by users who are circumventing the new policy in a variety of ways. There has also been a noted decline in the number of users in some skateparks in the territory. In one case the Lai Chi Kok skatepark that has been open for 13 years without the enforcement of any helmet rule has basically become empty.

    The introduction of the rule raises a considerable number of issues.

    • A large amount of public money has been spent on construction of these skateparks. They have been built for the community and are free to use. At the same time they provide an alternative to the street which can be a dangerous and problematic place for skateboarders to use. The street is also an uncontrolled environment for younger teenagers. With the introduction of unpopular rules skateboarders are eschewing the skateparks for the streets
    • Safety issues. In many ways helmets are regarded as a much safer option for skateboarders, BMX, and rollerbladers. However, part of skateboard culture rejects rules such as these. Skateboarders for example may not wear a helmet when they are skating ledges and small transitions but will choose to wear a helmet when skate larger vert obstacles. The imposition of rules my non-skaters has always been met with suspicion by skateboarders. A key part of skate culture is that skateboarders try and manage and control it.
    • Park usage. There are 2 new skateparks that have big bowls that take up roughly a quarter of the total park size. However these have never been open to the public. Even with the introduction of the new helmet rule the large bowls remain closed unless an organisation books them for an event. Then only members of that organisation can officially use the booked bowl. One has to question how skateboarders in Hong Kong can ever acquire the skills to ride these bowls in such situations.
    • The previous policy of the parks that required users to sign in and provide a waver had no issues. This method also provided the LCSD with data on how many users accessed the park, their ages, and genders. In sum an excellent tool to see who the parks are servicing. Since the introduction of the helmet rule no further data on numbers of users is being collected and they therefore have no firm numbers about the effect of the new policy.

    Many are in favour of a reversion to the previous arrangement. In this way helmet use was optional, but recommended and users could sign themselves in. It remains to be seen how things will develop from this point on.

     
     
  4. A look at skateboarding in Hong Kong courtesy of Hoyeung Lam and the filming of Alex Rodriguez. This evocative video provides a glimpse of skate culture in Hong Kong and the thoughts and passions of a skateboarder and their environment. 

    They did a great job.

     
     
  5. Congratulations to Professor Gordon Mathews who has won the 7th Hong Kong Book Prize for his book “Ghetto at the Center of the World” on Chungking Mansions.

     
     
  6. Taylor and Francis are offering 50 free downloads of my newly published paper, ”Hong Kong Muslims on Hajj: Rhythms of the Pilgrimage 2.0 and Experiences of Spirituality Among Twenty-First Century Global Cities”. This is published in the upcoming volume of the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs.
Follow this link to get access to this new paper.
I previously posted on this research here, and for other postings on my blog regarding hajj look here.

    Taylor and Francis are offering 50 free downloads of my newly published paper, ”Hong Kong Muslims on Hajj: Rhythms of the Pilgrimage 2.0 and Experiences of Spirituality Among Twenty-First Century Global Cities”. This is published in the upcoming volume of the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs.

    Follow this link to get access to this new paper.

    I previously posted on this research here, and for other postings on my blog regarding hajj look here.

     
     
  7. This development seems to have been in the pipeline for a while. Anti-discrimination laws are set to address the status of same-sex partnerships as having legal grounding, but not a move to legalise same-sex marriage. Also wording regarding citizenship seems to address the tension between Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong Chinese relations. This law will have to be enacted with parity and address misgivings and discrimination on both sides.

    Absent from the proposal is the recognition of religious discrimination, which has in many ways served as a proxy for racial discrimination. It is on this issue, that the louder noise of Hong Konger and Mainlander tensions serves to marginalise the peripheral position of ethnic minorities in the territory.

     
     
  8. More skateboard philanthropy. Hong Kong Board Rescue is asking people to donate old boards, wheels, and even bolts to help kids who can’t afford or get access to a board the chance to get skateboarding.

    This Saturday at Tseung Kwan O skatepark it will be Hong Kong’s ‘Go Skateboarding Day’ celebration. There people can also donate their old hardware.

    本星期六(6月28日)的香港滑板日於將軍澳滑板場內將設有舊滑板回收收集箱,
    請把你們用舊了的滑板或滑板配件帶到將軍澳滑板場捐贈給HK Board Rescue,
    我們會把滑板維修後轉贈給沒有能力購買滑板的朋友。
    現在我們有康民處管轄的免費極限運動場,但仍有人因各種原因而不能擁有自己的滑
    板,
    希望這一個小小的動作能帶給其他人玩滑板並非做壞事的訊息並能給他們玩滑板的機
    會。

     
     
  9. Hong Kong textbooks contain negative stereotypes on cultures and religions, researcher warns
The SCMP talks to Dr Liz Jackson at HKU about her research on representations of religious and ethnic minorities in Hong Kong school text books.
Great job Liz, bang up to date research addressing key issues in Hong Kong right now.

    Hong Kong textbooks contain negative stereotypes on cultures and religions, researcher warns

    The SCMP talks to Dr Liz Jackson at HKU about her research on representations of religious and ethnic minorities in Hong Kong school text books.

    Great job Liz, bang up to date research addressing key issues in Hong Kong right now.

     
     
  10. Hong Kong Go Skateboarding day postponed till the 28th due to the bad weather.

    Hong Kong Go Skateboarding day postponed till the 28th due to the bad weather.