Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnorFollow me on Academia.edu
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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  1. Hajj in the era of the Selfie

    The selfie has recently become entrenched as part of contemporary mobile media lifestyle. This focus is now evident in the reportage of this year’s hajj. stories about the ‘hajj selfie’ are numerous a google search will deliver articles from new websites such as the BBC and CNN and the Independent. Also you will see posts on tumblr, Facebook, and go to tagboard and type in hajj for more.

    Early in September some of my research on Hong Kong Muslims performing hajj was published and it looks at these very same themes. Not just the photographs that are being taken, but the general imposition of technology in the hajj. Surprisingly it is not necessarily regarded as a bad issue. Photos on hajj have long existed and their circulation only serves to promote the importance of the hajj and to encourage other Muslims to fulfil there obligations. In many cases the camera, the phone, the SMS are seen as an aid to pilgrims. This is why Saudi Arabia provides free wifi for pilgrims during hajj.

    For more on my research, visit here.

     
     
  2. This Friday Professor Liz Jackson at HKU will be having a book launch for her new monograph “Muslims and Islam in U.S. Education”. It is a free event and all are welcome.
19th Sept.
12:30-14:00
Room 408-410 Meng Wah Comple, HKU

    This Friday Professor Liz Jackson at HKU will be having a book launch for her new monograph “Muslims and Islam in U.S. Education”. It is a free event and all are welcome.

    19th Sept.

    12:30-14:00

    Room 408-410 Meng Wah Comple, HKU

     
     
  3. Taylor and Francis are offering 50 free downloads of my newly published paper, ”Hong Kong Muslims on Hajj: Rhythms of the Pilgrimage 2.0 and Experiences of Spirituality Among Twenty-First Century Global Cities”. This is published in the upcoming volume of the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs.
Follow this link to get access to this new paper.
I previously posted on this research here, and for other postings on my blog regarding hajj look here.

    Taylor and Francis are offering 50 free downloads of my newly published paper, ”Hong Kong Muslims on Hajj: Rhythms of the Pilgrimage 2.0 and Experiences of Spirituality Among Twenty-First Century Global Cities”. This is published in the upcoming volume of the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs.

    Follow this link to get access to this new paper.

    I previously posted on this research here, and for other postings on my blog regarding hajj look here.

     
     
  4. Backyard Culture
Story from today’s China Daily on building Mosques in Hong Kong and discrimination.

    Backyard Culture

    Story from today’s China Daily on building Mosques in Hong Kong and discrimination.

     
     
  5. From the Pew Research Centre. Some key facts about Hajj.

     
     
  6. hajjdiary:

    The journey from sydney to madinah was interesting, because I was never before able to comprehend what a 40 hour journey could mean. A hundred years ago people would spend months travelling to madinah from as close as india, they would do so by horse and its possible some of them may die along…

    A fascinating and topical tumblr following the account of a Muslim man from Sydney on Hajj.

     
     
  7. I’m giving a talk in a few weeks at Hong Kong Anthropological Society on the Modern organisation of the Hajj and experiences of Hong Kong pilgrims.

    Wednesday 16 October 2013, 7:00pm

    Hong Kong Museum of History Lecture Hall, Ground Floor, 100 Chatham Road, Tsim Sha Tsui  

    The annual pilgrimage to Mecca is both a sacred religious rite and an incredible human and logistical feat. This talk explores the hajj in the 21st century, explaining both the ancient rites and the experiences of Muslims making the pilgrimage from Hong Kong. How do Muslims prepare to make hajj, what are the challenges of the modern pilgrimage, and what can we learn about hajj from the Hong Kong perspective? Through a variety of accounts we come to see the profound spiritual journey that Muslims encounter and also the more quotidian challenges of the pilgrimage. Whilst travel to Mecca has become more accessible, affordable and less hazardous over the centuries, it continues to pose numerous challenges. In exploring these issues, a series of connections are made between the lives of Muslims and the rhythms of the modern globalized Mecca.

     
     
  8. The South China Morning post reports on Imam Arshad at the Kowloon Mosque. I was very pleased to read this feature which not only represents the positive position of Islam in Hong Kong, but also provides insight into Hong Kong’s chief Imam.
Read it here

    The South China Morning post reports on Imam Arshad at the Kowloon Mosque. I was very pleased to read this feature which not only represents the positive position of Islam in Hong Kong, but also provides insight into Hong Kong’s chief Imam.

    Read it here

     
     
  9. ‘The twain shall and do meet’: narrating conversion to Islam in Britain > From Open Democracy.
This report talks about the what I would term as the ‘everyday hybridity’ of being a female British convert to Islam. It looks at how the issue of gender really distills the boundary of conflict between the ‘Western woman and the Muslim woman. Some of the points engage with the contrasts of being a white British convert in comparison to black British converts, and again the contrast between ‘heritage’ Muslims and those coming to Islam through their own path. It is a very hopeful account of how the seemingly insurmountable can be negotiated in quotidian terms.
This also connects with what David Jacobson has noted. That increasingly the boundaries of culture, ideology, and politics are being negotiated via the position of women. 
At the end of the article there is also a link to the full report from Cambridge University Islamic Studies department.

    ‘The twain shall and do meet’: narrating conversion to Islam in Britain > From Open Democracy.

    This report talks about the what I would term as the ‘everyday hybridity’ of being a female British convert to Islam. It looks at how the issue of gender really distills the boundary of conflict between the ‘Western woman and the Muslim woman. Some of the points engage with the contrasts of being a white British convert in comparison to black British converts, and again the contrast between ‘heritage’ Muslims and those coming to Islam through their own path. It is a very hopeful account of how the seemingly insurmountable can be negotiated in quotidian terms.

    This also connects with what David Jacobson has noted. That increasingly the boundaries of culture, ideology, and politics are being negotiated via the position of women. 

    At the end of the article there is also a link to the full report from Cambridge University Islamic Studies department.

     
     
  10. This short editorial on Indonesian Foriegn Domestic Workers in Taiwan is an interesting contrast to the situation here in Hong Kong. Space is the issue that is identified and it has so often been the issue with FDWs in Hong Kong too.

    I must say a thanks to Dr Batairwa for passing this on to me.