Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

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cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnorFollow me on Academia.edu
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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  1. Watchers of Islam in Hong Kong will be interested to know of the recent new development of, for the first time, a weekly radio broadcast on public radio on Islam.
Mr Ibrahim of the Serving Islam group is the presenter of a weekly show in which a variety of key topics on Islam are addressed by he and his guests. Over the last few weeks he has spoken with local Muslims, Hong Kong Chinese converts to Islam. In each episode members of the public are invited to call in and ask questions. In this week’s coming episode he is speaking to Hong Kong’s Chief Imam Mufti Muhammad Arshad. This week’s topic is violence in Islam.
This will particularly topical to some of my students as we address the issue of ‘jihad’ in this coming week’s lecture.
Those interested in listening to previous episodes of the show, follow this link.

    Watchers of Islam in Hong Kong will be interested to know of the recent new development of, for the first time, a weekly radio broadcast on public radio on Islam.

    Mr Ibrahim of the Serving Islam group is the presenter of a weekly show in which a variety of key topics on Islam are addressed by he and his guests. Over the last few weeks he has spoken with local Muslims, Hong Kong Chinese converts to Islam. In each episode members of the public are invited to call in and ask questions. In this week’s coming episode he is speaking to Hong Kong’s Chief Imam Mufti Muhammad Arshad. This week’s topic is violence in Islam.

    This will particularly topical to some of my students as we address the issue of ‘jihad’ in this coming week’s lecture.

    Those interested in listening to previous episodes of the show, follow this link.

     
     
  2. A short but powerful video by Gratiane de Moustier about the recruitment and employment of Indonesian foreign domestic workers in Hong Kong.

    A collection of the pictures from the project are also available here at the Hong Wrong blog.

     
     
  3. Pictures from Hong Kong’s Islamic cemetery. The cemetery dates back to the 1850s when land was first given to Hong Kong’s Muslim community. At that time a small mosque was also situated there to provide rites for the dead. During the late 1970s it was reduced in size to make way for the Abderdeen tunnel. There is currently some work taking place on the site. It is a fascinating spot that provides a glimpse into Hong Kong’s past and present diversity.

     
     
  4. This month I am featured on New Books in Islamic Studies. I had a very enjoyable chat with Professor Kristian Petersen about my book. The New Books Network provides a great selection of coverage on a variety of academic subjects from scholarly authors.
Take a look…

    This month I am featured on New Books in Islamic Studies. I had a very enjoyable chat with Professor Kristian Petersen about my book. The New Books Network provides a great selection of coverage on a variety of academic subjects from scholarly authors.

    Take a look…

     
     
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  6. An update on some current research. As Muslims in Hong Kong are preparing to make Hajj this year, I have been following some of the preparations. Last week a meeting was held at the Kowloon Mosque to provide information on both the spiritual and secular preparations that pilgrims must make.

    I will be presenting a talk on this subject in mid-October too.

     
     
  7. The South China Morning post reports on Imam Arshad at the Kowloon Mosque. I was very pleased to read this feature which not only represents the positive position of Islam in Hong Kong, but also provides insight into Hong Kong’s chief Imam.
Read it here

    The South China Morning post reports on Imam Arshad at the Kowloon Mosque. I was very pleased to read this feature which not only represents the positive position of Islam in Hong Kong, but also provides insight into Hong Kong’s chief Imam.

    Read it here

     
     
  8. An interesting report on Islam in Hong Kong by ‘The National’ an English newspaper from Abu Dhabi. It is a good piece aimed at Muslim tourists visiting the Hong Kong. Also of interest for anyone curious about the life of Muslims in the territory.

     
     
  9. "Islam in Hong Kong is a much-needed contribution to the fields of Asian studies and religious studies as a window into the reality of Muslim diversity that has too often been overshadowed by Western experiences of Muslim minorities or attempts to unfold the puzzle of Islam in China. Hong Kong is a world in itself, and its religious life has been long neglected by scholars. This book makes the everyday experiences of Muslim residents in this city available for comparative purposes and it opens numerous opportunities for further research."
    — 

    Chiara Formichi’s review of my book “Islam in Hong” in the current issue of Asian Anthropology.

    Professor Formichi provides a very well balanced and insightful overview of the text.

     
     
  10. The latest edition of the Global South Sephis eMagazine carries a review of my book ‘Islam in Hong Kong’. The Sephis Magazine is a rich publication that provides an academic perspective and dialogue on issue emerging from the Global South. Their newsletters are well written and cover a variety of issues, so they are certainly worth a look. This current issue relates to the Everyday in the Global South.

    Here is a small excerpt from the review of my book.

    "In the last few decades, there has emerged a veritable flood of scholarly and amateur works on Islam and/or Muslims. While some of these works have been outstanding in terms of the erudition and reflection that went into their making, a considerably larger number of works have tended to appear simply because a market has appeared for books on Islam – particularly since 9/11. Most of these works are not likely to have much shelf-life, vanishing presumably as the hatred/antipathy towards, and ignorance of, Islam (which spawned such literature in the first place) would also – hopefully – diminish. Much of this literature on Islam and Muslims has tried to understand the complexity of Islam and the Muslim identity, from the standpoints of both insiders and outsiders, in a global environment that has often tended to look askance at these.

    O’Connor’s book on Islam and Muslim Life in Hong Kong, I would wager, stands a decent chance of having a reasonable shelf-life, largely because it is – thankfully – not about Islam. For sure, it deals with Muslim life (and that is not the same as Islam), but it limits the compass of the work to the extremely unusual set of experiences of Muslims living in the city of Hong Kong. Part of a series of works on the culture and society of Hong Kong, O’Connor’s work attempts to present before us an anthropological sliver of the city’s life – concentrating on a small community of people (three per cent of the whole population) bound by their religion, despite coming from a variety of ethnic and national backgrounds…

    The most delightful feature of the book is the author’s passionate association with his adopted city. The fascinating details about the city itself, the gentle care with which the word-portraits conjure up the images of the city, the loving familiarity with not merely the various quarters of the city but also with the people who inhabit these quarters – all these allow the reader to see the city through O’Connor’s eyes, which is becoming an increasingly rare kind of penmanship. The chapter on ‘transformation’ of the colonial city of Hong Kong into the World City of the People’s Republic, with a demographic profile unlike any other Chinese city anywhere in the mainland, conveys with some dexterity the problems faced by a city like Hong Kong in absorbing people from different countries – for instance introducing anti- racism laws to making Indonesian domestic workers feel at home in the city.”

    Global South - Kingshuk Chatterjee - April 2013, pg.88