Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnor
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
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Posts on Islam
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  1. The latest edition of the Global South Sephis eMagazine carries a review of my book ‘Islam in Hong Kong’. The Sephis Magazine is a rich publication that provides an academic perspective and dialogue on issue emerging from the Global South. Their newsletters are well written and cover a variety of issues, so they are certainly worth a look. This current issue relates to the Everyday in the Global South.

    Here is a small excerpt from the review of my book.

    "In the last few decades, there has emerged a veritable flood of scholarly and amateur works on Islam and/or Muslims. While some of these works have been outstanding in terms of the erudition and reflection that went into their making, a considerably larger number of works have tended to appear simply because a market has appeared for books on Islam – particularly since 9/11. Most of these works are not likely to have much shelf-life, vanishing presumably as the hatred/antipathy towards, and ignorance of, Islam (which spawned such literature in the first place) would also – hopefully – diminish. Much of this literature on Islam and Muslims has tried to understand the complexity of Islam and the Muslim identity, from the standpoints of both insiders and outsiders, in a global environment that has often tended to look askance at these.

    O’Connor’s book on Islam and Muslim Life in Hong Kong, I would wager, stands a decent chance of having a reasonable shelf-life, largely because it is – thankfully – not about Islam. For sure, it deals with Muslim life (and that is not the same as Islam), but it limits the compass of the work to the extremely unusual set of experiences of Muslims living in the city of Hong Kong. Part of a series of works on the culture and society of Hong Kong, O’Connor’s work attempts to present before us an anthropological sliver of the city’s life – concentrating on a small community of people (three per cent of the whole population) bound by their religion, despite coming from a variety of ethnic and national backgrounds…

    The most delightful feature of the book is the author’s passionate association with his adopted city. The fascinating details about the city itself, the gentle care with which the word-portraits conjure up the images of the city, the loving familiarity with not merely the various quarters of the city but also with the people who inhabit these quarters – all these allow the reader to see the city through O’Connor’s eyes, which is becoming an increasingly rare kind of penmanship. The chapter on ‘transformation’ of the colonial city of Hong Kong into the World City of the People’s Republic, with a demographic profile unlike any other Chinese city anywhere in the mainland, conveys with some dexterity the problems faced by a city like Hong Kong in absorbing people from different countries – for instance introducing anti- racism laws to making Indonesian domestic workers feel at home in the city.”

    Global South - Kingshuk Chatterjee - April 2013, pg.88

     

     
     
  2. On Morning Brew RTHK 3, and the FCC Monday 14th

    This Monday I will be popping in to have a chat with Phil Whelan on his show Morning Brew at RTHK Radio 3. Then I will be at the Hong Kong Foreign Correspondent’s Club for a lunchtime talk on my book “Islam in Hong Kong”.

     
     
  3. Lunchtime talk at the FCC on 14th Jan.
I will be talking about Muslims in Hong Kong and present day issues of minority politics in the territory. I will also be promoting my book!

    Lunchtime talk at the FCC on 14th Jan.

    I will be talking about Muslims in Hong Kong and present day issues of minority politics in the territory. I will also be promoting my book!

     
     
  4. The book is published!
A little ahead of schedule, and now available from HKU Press. In the coming weeks it will appear on Amazon, in local bookstores, and slowly start making its way to libraries.
Thanks for all the interest from my Tumblr followers, friends, colleagues, research participants and everyone else who has contributed in one way or another.
Keep posted for further news about the release.
Here are some of the book’s endorsements….
"An unexpected gem. An innovative book which explores the everyday lived reality of Muslim minorities in Hong Kong. The contemporary focus is framed by a fascinating history of South Asian Muslims which reaches back into the early 19th century. This beautifully wrought study sheds a great deal of light on a range of issues impacting Muslim minorities: from the extent of hybridity—adapting basketball spaces to cricket—to the challenge of eating halal in a culinary culture where pork is ubiquitous! Young Muslims in Hong Kong face racism and their inability to access Chinese language schools has huge implications for employment and social mobility. However, Islam is respected and they are not seen through a security lens. In all, a hopeful study." — Philip Lewis, author of Islamic Britain and Young, British and Muslim "There has long been a need for a book-length account of Muslims in Hong Kong; this readable and informative book admirably fills the void. Anyone interested in how Muslims make their lives and practice their faith in the Chinese city of Hong Kong should definitely read it." — Gordon Mathews, author of Ghetto at the Center of the World: Chungking Mansions, Hong Kong "In this insightful and fascinating book, O’Connor walks us through the bustling streets of Hong Kong, where space, civility, hope and freedom are created every day by the territory’s diverse Muslims. It provides a rare glimpse into an imperfect, but perhaps ‘good enough’ cosmopolitanism, lived in the schools, homes, shops and lives of ordinary people. Amidst the worry and panic about young Muslims in diaspora as either problems or victims, this is a refreshing and much-needed account of the valuable ways a global city deals with difference. An essential text for scholars and students of youth, diversity and contemporary multiculturalism." — Anita Harris, author of Young People and Everyday Multiculturalism

    The book is published!

    A little ahead of schedule, and now available from HKU Press. In the coming weeks it will appear on Amazon, in local bookstores, and slowly start making its way to libraries.

    Thanks for all the interest from my Tumblr followers, friends, colleagues, research participants and everyone else who has contributed in one way or another.

    Keep posted for further news about the release.

    Here are some of the book’s endorsements….

    "An unexpected gem. An innovative book which explores the everyday lived reality of Muslim minorities in Hong Kong. The contemporary focus is framed by a fascinating history of South Asian Muslims which reaches back into the early 19th century. This beautifully wrought study sheds a great deal of light on a range of issues impacting Muslim minorities: from the extent of hybridity—adapting basketball spaces to cricket—to the challenge of eating halal in a culinary culture where pork is ubiquitous! Young Muslims in Hong Kong face racism and their inability to access Chinese language schools has huge implications for employment and social mobility. However, Islam is respected and they are not seen through a security lens. In all, a hopeful study." — Philip Lewis, author of Islamic Britain and Young, British and Muslim 

    "There has long been a need for a book-length account of Muslims in Hong Kong; this readable and informative book admirably fills the void. Anyone interested in how Muslims make their lives and practice their faith in the Chinese city of Hong Kong should definitely read it." — Gordon Mathews, author of Ghetto at the Center of the World: Chungking Mansions, Hong Kong 

    "In this insightful and fascinating book, O’Connor walks us through the bustling streets of Hong Kong, where space, civility, hope and freedom are created every day by the territory’s diverse Muslims. It provides a rare glimpse into an imperfect, but perhaps ‘good enough’ cosmopolitanism, lived in the schools, homes, shops and lives of ordinary people. Amidst the worry and panic about young Muslims in diaspora as either problems or victims, this is a refreshing and much-needed account of the valuable ways a global city deals with difference. An essential text for scholars and students of youth, diversity and contemporary multiculturalism." — Anita Harris, author of Young People and Everyday Multiculturalism

     
     
  5. A few book sites are now listing my book and it is due to be published at the end of October by HKUP. Both hardback and paperback copies will be available.

     
     
  6. The Anthropology department at CUHK has a good blog about events and seminars. It has just been updated with a short piece on my seminar there last week.

    Check it out.