Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnorFollow me on Academia.edu
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
Posts on Hong Kong
Posts on Islam
Posts on Skateboarding

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  1. I have just received another endorsement for my book from Philip Lewis author of Islamic Britain and Young, British and Muslim.
Here is what he has to say about my forthcoming book, Islam in Hong Kong.


An unexpected gem. An innovative study which explores the everyday lived reality of Muslim minorities in Hong Kong. The contemporary focus is framed by a fascinating history of South Asian Muslims which reaches back into the early 19th century. The return of Hong Kong to China in 1997 meant many adjustments to a Pakistani community whose forbears once policed the local Chinese for the British. This beautifully wrought study sheds a great deal of light on a range of issues impacting Muslim minorities: from the extent of hybridity – adapting basketball spaces to cricket -  to the challenge of eating halal in a culinary culture where pork is ubiquitous!  Young Muslims in Hong Kong face challenges of racism and an inability to access Chinese language schools with huge implications for employment and social mobility. However, Islam is respected and they are not seen through a security lens. In all, a hopeful study.      
Philip Lewis

    I have just received another endorsement for my book from Philip Lewis author of Islamic Britain and Young, British and Muslim.

    Here is what he has to say about my forthcoming book, Islam in Hong Kong.

    An unexpected gem. An innovative study which explores the everyday lived reality of Muslim minorities in Hong Kong. The contemporary focus is framed by a fascinating history of South Asian Muslims which reaches back into the early 19th century. The return of Hong Kong to China in 1997 meant many adjustments to a Pakistani community whose forbears once policed the local Chinese for the British. This beautifully wrought study sheds a great deal of light on a range of issues impacting Muslim minorities: from the extent of hybridity – adapting basketball spaces to cricket -  to the challenge of eating halal in a culinary culture where pork is ubiquitous!  Young Muslims in Hong Kong face challenges of racism and an inability to access Chinese language schools with huge implications for employment and social mobility. However, Islam is respected and they are not seen through a security lens. In all, a hopeful study.      

    Philip Lewis