Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnorFollow me on Academia.edu
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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  1. "If there are connections everywhere, why do we persist in turning dynamic, interconnected phenomena into static, disconnected things?"
    — 

    Eric Wolf - Europe and the People Without History. pg 4

    Revisiting this text for next week’s Globalization class. So many great and powerful points within the first few pages.

     
     
  2. Multiracial Korea
A posting this week on Korea Bang spoke of the rise of multicultural families in South Korea. One of the key aspects of this post was the alarm of such developments voiced by netizens. There is also a good piece on this via dissertation reviews which provides further context.
Last semester one of my students also wrote an engaging research paper on this topic.
What is particularly interesting about Korea is that, alike Japan, and to a lesser extent China, these are some of a handful of countries that have preserved a fiction of a singular ethnic group entirely congruent with the national identity of the country. Dru Gladney’s book Dislocating China does a superb job at challenging this idea within China and Jan Nederveen Pieterse also has a great book called Ethnicities and Global Multiculture that challenges the idea that anyplace was ever monocultural. A good compliment to these works in an anthropological perspective is Eric Woolf’s Europe and the People without History.
These discussion on ethnicity relate back to the idea of rhythm, places and times fluctuate between eras of standardisation and diversification. Korea is now in the spotlight.

    Multiracial Korea

    A posting this week on Korea Bang spoke of the rise of multicultural families in South Korea. One of the key aspects of this post was the alarm of such developments voiced by netizens. There is also a good piece on this via dissertation reviews which provides further context.

    Last semester one of my students also wrote an engaging research paper on this topic.

    What is particularly interesting about Korea is that, alike Japan, and to a lesser extent China, these are some of a handful of countries that have preserved a fiction of a singular ethnic group entirely congruent with the national identity of the country. Dru Gladney’s book Dislocating China does a superb job at challenging this idea within China and Jan Nederveen Pieterse also has a great book called Ethnicities and Global Multiculture that challenges the idea that anyplace was ever monocultural. A good compliment to these works in an anthropological perspective is Eric Woolf’s Europe and the People without History.

    These discussion on ethnicity relate back to the idea of rhythm, places and times fluctuate between eras of standardisation and diversification. Korea is now in the spotlight.

     
     
  3. Congratulations to Professor Gordon Mathews who has won the 7th Hong Kong Book Prize for his book “Ghetto at the Center of the World” on Chungking Mansions.

     
     
  4. Taylor and Francis are offering 50 free downloads of my newly published paper, ”Hong Kong Muslims on Hajj: Rhythms of the Pilgrimage 2.0 and Experiences of Spirituality Among Twenty-First Century Global Cities”. This is published in the upcoming volume of the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs.
Follow this link to get access to this new paper.
I previously posted on this research here, and for other postings on my blog regarding hajj look here.

    Taylor and Francis are offering 50 free downloads of my newly published paper, ”Hong Kong Muslims on Hajj: Rhythms of the Pilgrimage 2.0 and Experiences of Spirituality Among Twenty-First Century Global Cities”. This is published in the upcoming volume of the Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs.

    Follow this link to get access to this new paper.

    I previously posted on this research here, and for other postings on my blog regarding hajj look here.

     
     
  5. The Department of Anthropology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, invites graduate students in Asia and elsewhere to present their current research at our 7th Postgraduate Student Forum: “Impacting the World: The Emerging Voices of Asian Anthropology”. The Forum, to be held 23-24 January 2015 (Friday and Saturday) at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, will showcase the best of students’ contemporary research on Asia. Hong Kong is a global city, a major node for trade, investment, and the exchange of ideas. The Postgraduate Student Forum seeks to encourage the communication among young anthropologists in and of the East and Southeast Asian region, to help improve their research and to make the excellent research being conducted in Asia to be better known internationally. 
Presentations and Panels
We accept proposals for individual papers ONLY this year. Papers of different topics are welcome, ethnographic work preferred. Papers will then be organized into panels. Each paper presentation will last 15 minutes; PowerPoint and multimedia equipment will be provided. The language of the forum will be English. 
How to Apply
Application procedure and additional information can be found athttp://www.cuhk.edu.hk/ant/pgforum7/index.html Deadline for abstracts is 30 September 2014.   
Forum Dates 
23-24 January 2015 (Friday and Saturday)  For additional information, visit http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/ant/pgforum7/index.html or email anthforum@cuhk.edu.hk telephone: +852 3943 7670

    The Department of Anthropology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, invites graduate students in Asia and elsewhere to present their current research at our 7th Postgraduate Student Forum: “Impacting the World: The Emerging Voices of Asian Anthropology”. The Forum, to be held 23-24 January 2015 (Friday and Saturday) at The Chinese University of Hong Kong, will showcase the best of students’ contemporary research on Asia. 

    Hong Kong is a global city, a major node for trade, investment, and the exchange of ideas. The Postgraduate Student Forum seeks to encourage the communication among young anthropologists in and of the East and Southeast Asian region, to help improve their research and to make the excellent research being conducted in Asia to be better known internationally. 

    Presentations and Panels

    We accept proposals for individual papers ONLY this year. Papers of different topics are welcome, ethnographic work preferred. Papers will then be organized into panels. Each paper presentation will last 15 minutes; PowerPoint and multimedia equipment will be provided. The language of the forum will be English. 

    How to Apply

    Application procedure and additional information can be found athttp://www.cuhk.edu.hk/ant/pgforum7/index.html 
    Deadline for abstracts is 30 September 2014
      

    Forum Dates 

    23-24 January 2015 (Friday and Saturday)  


    For additional information, 
    visit http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/ant/pgforum7/index.html or 
    email anthforum@cuhk.edu.hk 
    telephone: +852 3943 7670

     
     
  6. If you missed Nicole Constable’s recent book launch, there are two further opportunities to hear her talk about her work. On the 13th of June at HKU and also on the 16th of June at FCO in Hong Kong.
Further details can be obtained via the HKU Press site.

    If you missed Nicole Constable’s recent book launch, there are two further opportunities to hear her talk about her work. On the 13th of June at HKU and also on the 16th of June at FCO in Hong Kong.

    Further details can be obtained via the HKU Press site.

     
     
  7. Some thoughts on the THES University rankings.

     
     
  8. CUHK Undergraduate Student Forum

    This afternoon our students provided short presentations on their final year projects. The organisation, the topics, and the presentations were excellent. Projects included, but were not limited to, the marginalisation of waste management workers, DJs negotiating new technology, BDSM in Hong Kong, leaving pool meals, and the everyday complexities of left handedness.

    The students, I am proud to say, did a great job. Looking forward to next year’s event.

     
     
  9. Free access to past papers from Ethnic and Racial Studied Journal

     
     
  10. Upcoming Event at CUHK

    The Philomathia Lectures on Human Values 2014

    Is it possible to be a robust cultural pluralist and a dedicated liberal at the same time? How are anthropologists and psychologists steeped in a liberal ethics of autonomy able to fairly represent the moral thinking of “others” whose moral judgments are rooted in an illiberal ethics of community and divinity? Although this year’s Philomathia Lectures will present a thumbnail sketch of five major findings from research on the cultural psychology of moral thinking the main objectives of the lectures are (1) to highlight the limits of liberal moral concepts for judging the moral foundations of diverse cultural traditions; (2) to ask what a highly developed social intelligence should look like in a complex multicultural society; and (3) to open a long overdue conversation about the provocative “equality-difference paradox”, which suggests that embracing cultural diversity and promoting economic equality are not harmonious social policy goals.


    Professor Richard Shweder is Harold Higgins Swift Distinguished Service Professor Department of Comparative Human Development at The University of Chicago

    Tuesday 25 March 2014
    The Moral Challenge of Robust Cultural Pluralism

    Wednesday 26 March 2014
    The Equality-Difference Paradox: Lessons from a Jewish Village

    Thursday 27 March 2014
    Response Lectures
    Feat. Prof. Joan Miller, Prof. Tage Rai and Prof. Michael Bond

    All lectures begin at 5.30pm
    Cho Yiu Hall, G/F,
    University Administration Building,
    The Chinese University of Hong Kong