Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnor
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
Posts on Hong Kong
Posts on Islam
Posts on Skateboarding

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  1. Free access to past papers from Ethnic and Racial Studied Journal

     
     
  2. Upcoming Event at CUHK

    The Philomathia Lectures on Human Values 2014

    Is it possible to be a robust cultural pluralist and a dedicated liberal at the same time? How are anthropologists and psychologists steeped in a liberal ethics of autonomy able to fairly represent the moral thinking of “others” whose moral judgments are rooted in an illiberal ethics of community and divinity? Although this year’s Philomathia Lectures will present a thumbnail sketch of five major findings from research on the cultural psychology of moral thinking the main objectives of the lectures are (1) to highlight the limits of liberal moral concepts for judging the moral foundations of diverse cultural traditions; (2) to ask what a highly developed social intelligence should look like in a complex multicultural society; and (3) to open a long overdue conversation about the provocative “equality-difference paradox”, which suggests that embracing cultural diversity and promoting economic equality are not harmonious social policy goals.


    Professor Richard Shweder is Harold Higgins Swift Distinguished Service Professor Department of Comparative Human Development at The University of Chicago

    Tuesday 25 March 2014
    The Moral Challenge of Robust Cultural Pluralism

    Wednesday 26 March 2014
    The Equality-Difference Paradox: Lessons from a Jewish Village

    Thursday 27 March 2014
    Response Lectures
    Feat. Prof. Joan Miller, Prof. Tage Rai and Prof. Michael Bond

    All lectures begin at 5.30pm
    Cho Yiu Hall, G/F,
    University Administration Building,
    The Chinese University of Hong Kong

     
     
  3. 800,000 Year Old Human Footprints Discovered in Norfolk

    (The Guardian)

    The oldest human footprints ever found outside Africa, left in a muddy river estuary 800,000 years ago, have been discovered in Norfolk by scientists from the British Museum and other national museums and universities.

    National History Museum

     
     
  4. (Source: thresholdukraine)

     
     
  5. It has been a busy week and I have been slower than usual with updates. Hi to all my new followers, I hope you enjoy the blog.
Today was the first day of CUHK’s 6th Annual Postgraduate Student Forum. The event has been really engaging and I am very proud to be associated with it. It is a truly international event with scholars sharing their research in numerous fields, from a host of universities. The calibre of the presentations has been excellent and I have been exposed to some promising academics and new avenues of research. It has also been a great opportunity to catch up with people too.
I must also mention that the forum is also highly commendable as it has been organised solely by the postgraduate students at CUHK Anthropology. It’s a mammoth task and a real testament to our students and the department. Bravo!
The event continues tomorrow at Yasumoto International Park CUHK campus.
Follow the link for a rundown of the presentations.

    It has been a busy week and I have been slower than usual with updates. Hi to all my new followers, I hope you enjoy the blog.

    Today was the first day of CUHK’s 6th Annual Postgraduate Student Forum. The event has been really engaging and I am very proud to be associated with it. It is a truly international event with scholars sharing their research in numerous fields, from a host of universities. The calibre of the presentations has been excellent and I have been exposed to some promising academics and new avenues of research. It has also been a great opportunity to catch up with people too.

    I must also mention that the forum is also highly commendable as it has been organised solely by the postgraduate students at CUHK Anthropology. It’s a mammoth task and a real testament to our students and the department. Bravo!

    The event continues tomorrow at Yasumoto International Park CUHK campus.

    Follow the link for a rundown of the presentations.

     
     
  6. The Social Life of Plants in Space

    From the Michael Oman-Reagan’s Religion + Technology blog.

    If you read this, I guarantee you are all going to be following Mike Hopkins from now on. An interesting posting that ties twitter, space walks, sunflowers and ‘Silent Running’ together.

     
     
  7. I have a new paper  "Applying hybridity: rhythms of the Hajj, Tumblr, and Snowden" published in the first issue of the new Journal 'Glocalism'. This online peer reviewed journal also has contributions from Zygmunt Bauman and Roland Robertson. 
All the papers in the new issues tackle the theme of hybridity.
It looks to be an interesting new place of debate and interaction.

    I have a new paper  "Applying hybridity: rhythms of the Hajj, Tumblr, and Snowden" published in the first issue of the new Journal 'Glocalism'. This online peer reviewed journal also has contributions from Zygmunt Bauman and Roland Robertson

    All the papers in the new issues tackle the theme of hybridity.

    It looks to be an interesting new place of debate and interaction.

     
     
  8. Here is the link to today’s Morning Brew interview!

     
     
  9. On Morning Brew at Noon today

    This morning I will be speaking to Phil Whelan on RTHK3 Morning Brew about my Hajj talk for the Hong Kong Anthropological Society on Wednesay. We will discuss the pilgrimage to Mecca, how Hajj is organised from Hong Kong, and modern changes and challenges to the pilgrimage.

     
     
  10. White woman washes dishes in Hong Kong restaraunt!

    From the BadCanto blog we have a report on the story of a white woman who washes dishes in Yaumatei restaurant. It is one of those stories that disrupts some of the preconceptions of Hong Kong. Whenever we see a white person engaged in menial labour in Hong Kong it is reported as something peculiar and exotic. In recent years we have had a similar report on an Australian man who drove a mini-bus in Sai Kung, and also an expose on white Cantopop singer.

    A cursory look into the history of Hong Kong highlights that this is not so unusual. Forman (2004) acknowledges the writings of James Daziel and notes that despite popular representations the colonial machine was far from a uniform and bourgeois affair. In the late 19th and early 20th century Hong Kong attracted all manner of Europeans to the colony as sailors, vagabonds, and sex workers.

    The responses of netizens to this story from the Apple Daily challenge the trope of oriental orientalism that considers white people in Hong Kong as always being wealthy, disinterested in local culture, and ultimately not Hong-Kongers. There is indeed criticism of this, but at the same time if images of white people in mundane positions such as this are overlooked then the sort of understanding of difference that Hong Kong needs to achieve is not going to happen.

    Here again is the post from ChinaSmack that imagines and presents white people as the future migrant workers of China.