Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnor
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
Posts on Hong Kong
Posts on Islam
Posts on Skateboarding

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  1. "Anyone with the capacity to own in an era when the returns exceed those of wages and output will quickly become disproportionately and progressively richer. The incentive is to be a rentier rather than a risk-taker: witness the explosion of buy-to-let. Our companies and our rich don’t need to back frontier innovation or even invest to produce: they just need to harvest their returns and tax breaks, tax shelters and compound interest will do the rest."
     
     
  2. "The profit interests of the owners of neoliberal capital are served by the shrinkage of the social welfare state, the privatisation of what had once been publicly held utilities and institutions, the increase in stae, banking, and corporate pension insecurity, and the ever more “flexible” practices of contractual reciprocity between owners and workers, which ostensibly keep business nimble and more capable of responding to market demand."
    — 

    Laruen Berlant - Cruel Optimisim, pg 192.

    On precocity and the flaws of desiring a ‘good life’ not longer feasible for the majority.

     
     
  3. This great piece from Jenkem Mag on corporate skate culture now has a comment section 35 pages long. It is a really engaging topic and the feedback is topical and right up to date.

    This great piece from Jenkem Mag on corporate skate culture now has a comment section 35 pages long. It is a really engaging topic and the feedback is topical and right up to date.

     
     
  4. The Globalization of care for the elderly.

    "Sybille’s mother Elisabeth is 91 and has dementia.

    She has been living in a care home in Thailand with a dozen other Swiss and German residents for the past four years but struggles to remember anything from the present.”

     
     
  5. "If you spent US$1 every second, you would spend US$1 million in about twelve days. At the same rate, it would take you approximately thirty-two years to spend US$ 1 billion. Taking this to the next level, US$ 1 trillion would take you 31,546 years to spend!"
    — 

    (from Manfred B. Steger, Globalization: A Very Short Introduction)

    A thought provoking quote…

    Ever considered that the terms million, billion, and trillion seem too similar to make much of an impact? Well the above explanation goes some way to distinguishing the enormity of the differences between them all.

    Around US $3.98 trillion is the turnover each day in foreign exchange currency markets.

    In 2012 US$17.3 trillion dollars worth of merchandise was exported by WTO countries.

     
     
  6. I have had this on the shelf for a while and have just started to read it. It is a nice change of tack for Bauman and starts out surprisingly personal. The first entry is penned at 5am in the morning with nothing particular to say and a weight of loneliness in the air. Always a compelling writer.
I have no doubt that some excerpts will be posted here in due course…

    I have had this on the shelf for a while and have just started to read it. It is a nice change of tack for Bauman and starts out surprisingly personal. The first entry is penned at 5am in the morning with nothing particular to say and a weight of loneliness in the air. Always a compelling writer.

    I have no doubt that some excerpts will be posted here in due course…

     
     
  7. "The messages addressed from the sites of political power to the resourceful and the hapless alike present ‘more flexibility’ as the sole cure for an already unbearable insecurity - and so paint the prospect of yet more uncertainty, yet more privatization of troubles, yet more loneliness and impotence, and indeed more uncertainty still. They preclude the possibility of existential security which rests on collective foundations and so offer no inducement to solidary actions; instead, they encourage their listeners to focus on their individual survival in the style of ‘everyone for himself, and the devil take the hindmost’ - in an incurably fragmented and atomized, and so increasingly uncertain and unpredictable world."
    — Zygmunt Bauman (2007). Liquid Times: Living in an Age of Uncertainty. Polity Press, p. 14. (via silentlucidities)
     
     
  8. I spotted this on the Beeb and it is really very amusing. One of the fun things about the globalization of popular culture is that Koran pop songs can rise to the top of the US charts, and American’s can take on British slang.

    As an English guy in Hong Kong, one of the themes that recurs now that I am into my 11th year in the territory, is that people no longer can tell where I am from. At first Canadians, or Australians would question my accent and just not be able to place it. Then English people would ask me where I was from. They no longer meant regionally, they meant globally. This coincided with odd things happening to my vernacular, as I replaced pavement with sidewalk, rubbish with trash (though lupsup prevails), and also most shockingly, trousers for pants.

    Some people don’t lose their accents, some people do. The harder and more distinct the accent, the less likely it is to fade. The westcoutnry accent that I possess(ed), that comes back twice as strong around westcountry folk, is probably too soft to stand up to the barrage on internationalism that I navigate.

    But losing an accent isn’t as bad as losing your cultural vernacular…but then again as I cast my eyes back over the top of my post. I wrote the Beeb instinctively.

     
     
  9. This BBC news article provides a fascinating insight into the conflict in Syria from the perspective of Filipina Foreign Domestic Workers. Around 7,000 Filipina workers have been caught up in the troubles in Syria. Some of the women have been employed by members of Asad’s military regime and have encountered numerous obstacles in leaving the country. At a more basic level even getting a clear picture of the conflict has been a huge obstacle for many women.

    The fact that 1 out of every 9 people in the Philippines works abroad highlights the interconnections that the territory has with the vicissitudes of countries spread across the world. So often when we think of migrant workers we garner a picture of a global economy and freedom of movement. Stories like this realign the juxtaposition starkly.

     
     
  10. This new book on ‘Globalization from Below’ has just been released and has been edited by Gordon Mathews author of ‘Ghetto at the Center of the World’ it looks to be a very interesting title.
I got word of it some time ago and received a new notification today from Hong Kong Anthropological Society. It contained a link to Yang Yang’s blog. A former MA student in Anthropology at CUHK, she has an interesting and engaging blog. Her research on Afircans in Guanzhou is also fascinating. She contributes an article to the book also.
People interested in globalization, anthropology and sociology should definitely check it out.

    This new book on ‘Globalization from Below has just been released and has been edited by Gordon Mathews author of ‘Ghetto at the Center of the World’ it looks to be a very interesting title.

    I got word of it some time ago and received a new notification today from Hong Kong Anthropological Society. It contained a link to Yang Yang’s blog. A former MA student in Anthropology at CUHK, she has an interesting and engaging blog. Her research on Afircans in Guanzhou is also fascinating. She contributes an article to the book also.

    People interested in globalization, anthropology and sociology should definitely check it out.