Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

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cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnorFollow me on Academia.edu
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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  1. I was near the Theology building at CUHK yesterday, a fairly remote bit of campus and I stumbled on this sign. At first I thought it was another Umbrella Revolution sign, but on closer inspection….
Despite being entirely un-related, I couldn’t help but read the sign as some sort of urge for caution in the protests, a subtle signal about changing tactics.

    I was near the Theology building at CUHK yesterday, a fairly remote bit of campus and I stumbled on this sign. At first I thought it was another Umbrella Revolution sign, but on closer inspection….

    Despite being entirely un-related, I couldn’t help but read the sign as some sort of urge for caution in the protests, a subtle signal about changing tactics.

     
     
  2. Occupy Art. These photos come from @penguinesix and document some of the art that has been produced and posted at protest sites.

     
     
  3. Quick tour of the wifi-enabled, ever-expanding study corner at #OccupyHK

    Originally @tomgrundy

    (Source: vine.co)

     
     
  4. Interesting blog by Robert Castillo on Africans in China. Plenty of information. Castillo challenges ideas about the actual numbers of African in Guangzhou in his postings.

     
     
  5. One of my students turned in a paper earlier this week and provided the first photo above as an addition. It shows the area in Admiralty where the protesting students have set up a study area. It is here that people are catching up with their classes and writing up coursework.

    For those who are not in Hong Kong, the protests have been remarkable not because of the political atmosphere, but because of the reclamation of the city and of public space.

    The really radical thing about the last few weeks has been the co-operative ethos instilled and enacted by the students. In reclaiming a part of the city they have also introduced a new measure of civility in the city. People are enjoying walking around their city and actually talking and communicating with each other. Strangers are helping one another and working for collective goals. Despite being a `safe city, Hong Kong is so ordered by other forces (think of Sassen’s global business elite) that people have little say in the city. In recent years Hong Kong people have felt the city slip away from them. There is a real rich argument here from the closure of Queen’s Pier in Central in 2007 and its eventual demolition in 2008, to the reclamation of land for the Central Wanchai Bypass. With reference to the new road, a good chunk of Victoria Park has now been removed. There are too many other examples that also cut right into issues of public and social division. Little ownership of the city has resulted in a mass occupation and a renaissance of city decorum. 

    Democracy itself is an ambiguous goal. This however is a participatory democracy, an engaged public forum. Something that even democratic countries have trouble in pursuing, cultivating, or supporting. If people actually have a say in their lives, what remarkable things they can achieve.

    These new spaces of civic engagement are also full of emotional ties. The fact that they will soon be gone is saddening to many, but there is such pride and joy that they have existed.

    The other picture I include comes from a colleague who posted the photo and the comment on Facebook. I’ve kept her anonymous, but she posts a great point. It just goes to show what the city can really be like when people co-operate and share. This is after all ‘our’ city.

     
     
  6. The ‘Feeling Ethnic’ symposium at Baptist University begins tomorrow. It includes a refreshing mix of academics, community leaders, and films made by some of Hong Kong’s ethnic minority youth.
The website for the symposium can be found here. I will also be speaking at the symposium tomorrow afternoon.
Feeling ethnic: visuality, emotions, and minority culture on 15 to 17 October 2014

Our ethnic minority population seems small yet keeps increasing. In recent years, ethnic minorities have received more attention, in particular politically, socially, and legally. Related studies, however, do not often explore ethnic minorities’ inner worlds. ‘How do people feel ethnic?’ is a question rarely asked and consequently central to the symposium. Coupled with a focus on media production, the symposium looks at how ethnic minorities use media forms to express themselves and what can be learnt from visual works about ethnic minority culture.

Programme
15th Oct (Day 1): Academic discussion: keynote speech, paper presentations and discussion
16th Oct (Day 2): Screening videos made by HK ethnic minority youth; discussion with community stakeholders
17th Oct (Day 3): Paper presentations; rounded up with closing remarks
Symposium Programme
 Venue
RRS905, Sir Run Run Shaw Building, Ho Sin Hang Campus, Hong Kong Baptist University (Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong) (Map)
 Scholars
Keynote Speaker: Prof. Elspeth Probyn (The University of Sydney, Australia)
Prof. Kim Hyun Mee (Yonsei University, South Korea),
Prof. Lo Kwai Cheung (Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong),
Dr. Ku Hok Bun (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong),
Dr. Julian Groves (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong),
Dr. Jennifer Biddle (The University of New South Wales, Australia),
Dr. Selvaraj Velayutham (Macquarie University, Australia),
Dr. Paul O’Connor (The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong),
Dr. Yuko Kawai (Rikkyo University, Japan),
Dr. Tanja Dreher (University of Wollongong, Australia),
Dr. Clifton Evers (University of Nottingham, Ningbo China)
Community speakers
Dr. Margaret Ng Ngoi-yee (Chairperson, Hong Kong Unison),
Lau Kwok Cheong (Film Director of Tactical Unit),
Vivek Mahbubani (Stand-up Comedian),
Ricky Chan (Actor),
Jan Yumul (Radio Host, Pinoy Fuse/President of ‘Section Juan’),
Maria Malik (University Student),
Kandal Satish (University Student),
George Gurung (Student),
Teresa Kwong (Assistant Programme Director of Hong Kong Arts Centre),
Lu Castro Luisa (Teacher at Islamic Kasim Tuet Memorial College),
Lo Kai-chung (Unit-in-Charge, HKSKH Lady MacLehose Centre),
Sky Sui (Acting Executive Director, KELY Support Group),
Dr. Chan Kui Pui (Principal of Glee Path Delia Memorial School),
Eric Tsang (Filmmaker),
Hector Telmo(Co-founder of Without Equal Productions),
Barua Olique Kumar (University Student)
Organized by
Department of Humanities and Creative Writing, Hong Kong Baptist University
Department of Cultural Studies, Lingnan University
Supported by
Hong Kong Academy of the Humanities

    The ‘Feeling Ethnic’ symposium at Baptist University begins tomorrow. It includes a refreshing mix of academics, community leaders, and films made by some of Hong Kong’s ethnic minority youth.

    The website for the symposium can be found here. I will also be speaking at the symposium tomorrow afternoon.

    Feeling ethnic: visuality, emotions, and minority culture on 15 to 17 October 2014

    Our ethnic minority population seems small yet keeps increasing. In recent years, ethnic minorities have received more attention, in particular politically, socially, and legally. Related studies, however, do not often explore ethnic minorities’ inner worlds. ‘How do people feel ethnic?’ is a question rarely asked and consequently central to the symposium. Coupled with a focus on media production, the symposium looks at how ethnic minorities use media forms to express themselves and what can be learnt from visual works about ethnic minority culture.

    Programme

    15th Oct (Day 1): Academic discussion: keynote speech, paper presentations and discussion

    16th Oct (Day 2): Screening videos made by HK ethnic minority youth; discussion with community stakeholders

    17th Oct (Day 3): Paper presentations; rounded up with closing remarks

    Symposium Programme

     Venue

    RRS905, Sir Run Run Shaw Building, Ho Sin Hang Campus, Hong Kong Baptist University (Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong) (Map)

     Scholars

    Keynote Speaker: Prof. Elspeth Probyn (The University of Sydney, Australia)

    • Prof. Kim Hyun Mee (Yonsei University, South Korea),
    • Prof. Lo Kwai Cheung (Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong),
    • Dr. Ku Hok Bun (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong),
    • Dr. Julian Groves (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong),
    • Dr. Jennifer Biddle (The University of New South Wales, Australia),
    • Dr. Selvaraj Velayutham (Macquarie University, Australia),
    • Dr. Paul O’Connor (The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong),
    • Dr. Yuko Kawai (Rikkyo University, Japan),
    • Dr. Tanja Dreher (University of Wollongong, Australia),
    • Dr. Clifton Evers (University of Nottingham, Ningbo China)

    Community speakers

    • Dr. Margaret Ng Ngoi-yee (Chairperson, Hong Kong Unison),
    • Lau Kwok Cheong (Film Director of Tactical Unit),
    • Vivek Mahbubani (Stand-up Comedian),
    • Ricky Chan (Actor),
    • Jan Yumul (Radio Host, Pinoy Fuse/President of ‘Section Juan’),
    • Maria Malik (University Student),
    • Kandal Satish (University Student),
    • George Gurung (Student),
    • Teresa Kwong (Assistant Programme Director of Hong Kong Arts Centre),
    • Lu Castro Luisa (Teacher at Islamic Kasim Tuet Memorial College),
    • Lo Kai-chung (Unit-in-Charge, HKSKH Lady MacLehose Centre),
    • Sky Sui (Acting Executive Director, KELY Support Group),
    • Dr. Chan Kui Pui (Principal of Glee Path Delia Memorial School),
    • Eric Tsang (Filmmaker),
    • Hector Telmo(Co-founder of Without Equal Productions),
    • Barua Olique Kumar (University Student)

    Organized by

    Department of Humanities and Creative Writing, Hong Kong Baptist University

    Department of Cultural Studies, Lingnan University

    Supported by

    Hong Kong Academy of the Humanities

     
     
  7. An infographic from the SCMP “Riot Gear of Protestors and Police”

    An infographic from the SCMP “Riot Gear of Protestors and Police”

     
     
  8. Hajj in the era of the Selfie

    The selfie has recently become entrenched as part of contemporary mobile media lifestyle. This focus is now evident in the reportage of this year’s hajj. stories about the ‘hajj selfie’ are numerous a google search will deliver articles from new websites such as the BBC and CNN and the Independent. Also you will see posts on tumblr, Facebook, and go to tagboard and type in hajj for more.

    Early in September some of my research on Hong Kong Muslims performing hajj was published and it looks at these very same themes. Not just the photographs that are being taken, but the general imposition of technology in the hajj. Surprisingly it is not necessarily regarded as a bad issue. Photos on hajj have long existed and their circulation only serves to promote the importance of the hajj and to encourage other Muslims to fulfil there obligations. In many cases the camera, the phone, the SMS are seen as an aid to pilgrims. This is why Saudi Arabia provides free wifi for pilgrims during hajj.

    For more on my research, visit here.

     
     
  9. Hong Wrong Blog has a history of cutting edge coverage. They make no exceptions here, with superb pictures telling the story of the start of Occupy Central.

    Tom Gundy’s twitter is also one of the best English language feeds on recent events. https://twitter.com/tomgrundy  

     
     
  10. This is the blog posting of a colleague and his experience at the protest yesterday.