Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnor
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

pages

My Publications
What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
Posts on Hong Kong
Posts on Islam
Posts on Skateboarding

tumblinks

search

free counters
Free counters

powered by tumblr
seattle theme by parker ehret

  1. This development seems to have been in the pipeline for a while. Anti-discrimination laws are set to address the status of same-sex partnerships as having legal grounding, but not a move to legalise same-sex marriage. Also wording regarding citizenship seems to address the tension between Mainland Chinese and Hong Kong Chinese relations. This law will have to be enacted with parity and address misgivings and discrimination on both sides.

    Absent from the proposal is the recognition of religious discrimination, which has in many ways served as a proxy for racial discrimination. It is on this issue, that the louder noise of Hong Konger and Mainlander tensions serves to marginalise the peripheral position of ethnic minorities in the territory.

     
     
  2. Backyard Culture
Story from today’s China Daily on building Mosques in Hong Kong and discrimination.

    Backyard Culture

    Story from today’s China Daily on building Mosques in Hong Kong and discrimination.

     
     
  3. Must say thanks to Larry Au for bringing this to my attention…further topical   reports on ethnicity in Hong Kong.

     
     
  4. There has been quite a furore this last week over school textbooks in Hong Kong which are intended to promote racial harmony. The concern is that these books simply essentialise different groups of people. In short they teach ethnicity by reinforcing stereotypes.

    The above pictures include an original page from one of the school text books and (via Hong Wrong) a parody of the textbook. See if you can spot the difference

    There has been plenty of coverage on this issue. If you haven’t heard about it yet, do pass by the Hong Wrong blog who provide great coverage.

    Thanks to all those people who have sent this to me over the last week also.

     
     
  5. attackingracism:

Infographic about racism in Hong Kong

    attackingracism:

    Infographic about racism in Hong Kong

     
     
  6.  
     
  7. Whilst the article argues that anti-racism laws could protect members of the same ethnic group from discriminating against each other, another question is how much do these people really recognise themselves as being of the same ethnicity? News stories that exacerbate the ways in which the two groups are polarised only serve to deepen the division and cloak the key politics issues at stake.

    As always the comments section is more enlightening than the news article.

     
     
  8. On being African in China
Zahra Baitie writes a candid piece about her experience of being an Africa n student in China. Many of the stories she recounts are familiar. The acceptance that Zahra provides of the way in which she is dealt with is both refreshing and telling of the situation that she finds herself in.
Much of what she talks about is a kind of everyday racism (Essed 1991), but it also underlines the very different way of talking about and confronting difference in China. There is a very candid and upfront attitude. 
Much of these experiences are similar to the ones that Africans experience in Hong Kong also. But arguably in Hong Kong there is also less fascination and a much more abrupt interruption of social distance and discrimination.
It reminds me of Fanon’s Black Skin White Masks, "look mum a negro girl". Zahra has had to constantly navigate being exotic whilst also being in an emic position. She speaks Mandarinm spent lost of time with a Chinese family and is able to understand the way she is analysed and discussed in everyday encounters.
It is also interesting to note that in Chinese negative characters are used to represent Africa. My friend Kirk who passed me the story says that Western countries have more positive names.

    On being African in China

    Zahra Baitie writes a candid piece about her experience of being an Africa n student in China. Many of the stories she recounts are familiar. The acceptance that Zahra provides of the way in which she is dealt with is both refreshing and telling of the situation that she finds herself in.

    Much of what she talks about is a kind of everyday racism (Essed 1991), but it also underlines the very different way of talking about and confronting difference in China. There is a very candid and upfront attitude. 

    Much of these experiences are similar to the ones that Africans experience in Hong Kong also. But arguably in Hong Kong there is also less fascination and a much more abrupt interruption of social distance and discrimination.

    It reminds me of Fanon’s Black Skin White Masks, "look mum a negro girl". Zahra has had to constantly navigate being exotic whilst also being in an emic position. She speaks Mandarinm spent lost of time with a Chinese family and is able to understand the way she is analysed and discussed in everyday encounters.

    It is also interesting to note that in Chinese negative characters are used to represent Africa. My friend Kirk who passed me the story says that Western countries have more positive names.

     
     
  9. There is an alarming paucity of positive representations of Muslims in the media. When we look at the British media this is distinct. As Hopkins (2009:36) notes “When Muslims are not being represented through negative images and discourses they tend to be absent.” It also seems to be that the BBC are increasingly aware of this and are consciously making efforts in their reportage to redress the situation.

    So, a story like this one is really quite welcome. It portrays not only the York Mosque in a very positive light, but it also redresses the overall picture that people with opposing views are unable to accommodate each other. It is all the more apposite with York’s grizzly history of anti semitism in 1190.

    What is also so interesting about this story is that it is couched in all of the things that a textbook might tell you to do in order to appease and disarm and Englishman. Bring tea and biscuits, talk about football. I can’t help but think that there was a decent amount of banter about that day’s weather too. So the EDL were disarmed with a cultural reflection? This story is also interesting because the very positive appraisal offered of the event comes from a Christian voice, that of Archbishop John Sentamu who is Ugandan. He has voiced criticism of multiculturalism as it is acted out in the UK, and claimed that the BBC is anxious about reporting negative stories on Muslims…so we have now come full circle.

     
     
  10. Thanks for the tip from chisamisa this is well worth a read.