Everyday Hybridity

Dr Paul O'Connor
Anthropology/Sociology/Cultural Studies/
Hong Kong/Ethnicity/
Skateboarding/Everyday Life

Lecturing in Anthropology at CUHK

Me

cuhk.academia.edu/PaulOConnor
@peejayohhsee
everydayhybridity@gmail.com

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My Publications
What is Everyday Hybridity?


Posts on Hybridity
Posts on Hong Kong
Posts on Islam
Posts on Skateboarding

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  1. Free access to past papers from Ethnic and Racial Studied Journal

     
     
  2. I have a new paper  "Applying hybridity: rhythms of the Hajj, Tumblr, and Snowden" published in the first issue of the new Journal 'Glocalism'. This online peer reviewed journal also has contributions from Zygmunt Bauman and Roland Robertson. 
All the papers in the new issues tackle the theme of hybridity.
It looks to be an interesting new place of debate and interaction.

    I have a new paper  "Applying hybridity: rhythms of the Hajj, Tumblr, and Snowden" published in the first issue of the new Journal 'Glocalism'. This online peer reviewed journal also has contributions from Zygmunt Bauman and Roland Robertson

    All the papers in the new issues tackle the theme of hybridity.

    It looks to be an interesting new place of debate and interaction.

     
     
  3. Hong Kong students studying abroad.
This infographic by Larry Au is part on an interesting blog which is covering public protest in Hong Kong. Larry is a Sociology student at Brown and his blog is well worth a look.

    Hong Kong students studying abroad.

    This infographic by Larry Au is part on an interesting blog which is covering public protest in Hong Kong. Larry is a Sociology student at Brown and his blog is well worth a look.

     
     
  4. I’ve been meaning to post something on the HKTV license situation. When the news broke last week that HKTV had lost their bid for a TV license there was wide unrest about the lack of transparency. The photo above shows the large turnout of people at Government HQ to demonstrate about the decision.
The situation has been gathering momentum and is turning out to be 2013’s equivalent of last year’s National Education controversy.
Here is today’s latest news from the SCMP, and a posting earlier in the week from the Hong Wrong blog.

    I’ve been meaning to post something on the HKTV license situation. When the news broke last week that HKTV had lost their bid for a TV license there was wide unrest about the lack of transparency. The photo above shows the large turnout of people at Government HQ to demonstrate about the decision.

    The situation has been gathering momentum and is turning out to be 2013’s equivalent of last year’s National Education controversy.

    Here is today’s latest news from the SCMP, and a posting earlier in the week from the Hong Wrong blog.

     
     
  5. A short but powerful video by Gratiane de Moustier about the recruitment and employment of Indonesian foreign domestic workers in Hong Kong.

    A collection of the pictures from the project are also available here at the Hong Wrong blog.

     
     
  6. "From Does the City Have Speech"
Saskia Sassen
Sassen ushers away methodology and provides us with ‘analytic tactics’ a way of engaging with what exists by looking at what it addresses and in the same process what it obscures. Without the bonds of rigorous method it is a tactic which can move the analyst towards new and interdisciplinary zones.

    "From Does the City Have Speech"

    Saskia Sassen

    Sassen ushers away methodology and provides us with ‘analytic tactics’ a way of engaging with what exists by looking at what it addresses and in the same process what it obscures. Without the bonds of rigorous method it is a tactic which can move the analyst towards new and interdisciplinary zones.

     
     
  7. "The key message is that through our fears of being left out and excluded, we have gleefully taken the responsibility of our own monitoring—always available, always able to be monitored. Perhaps the more subtle theme of the book is that we, too, whilst being watched, are also always watching."
    — 

    I just finished submitting my review of the Bauman and Lyon book for CSR. I thought I would include these final comments here as they are just so topical in the light of the Snowden affair and continued revelations of the U.S. and U.K. government, and NSA.

    One thing I mention in the review is that the book doesn’t talk a great deal about how the same technologies are being used to cast critique back at, and undermine, governments, businesses, and individuals that are doing the surveillance. This has been picked up nicely in Cyborgology with the humorous subversion of online surveillance. The ludic tweets they note, force the issue that although we remain complicit in using these technologies, we also know what is going on. Resistance through play, like Axel Foley and the Banana in the tailpipe!

     
     
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  9. I have had this on the shelf for a while and have just started to read it. It is a nice change of tack for Bauman and starts out surprisingly personal. The first entry is penned at 5am in the morning with nothing particular to say and a weight of loneliness in the air. Always a compelling writer.
I have no doubt that some excerpts will be posted here in due course…

    I have had this on the shelf for a while and have just started to read it. It is a nice change of tack for Bauman and starts out surprisingly personal. The first entry is penned at 5am in the morning with nothing particular to say and a weight of loneliness in the air. Always a compelling writer.

    I have no doubt that some excerpts will be posted here in due course…

     
     
  10. "Islam in Hong Kong is a much-needed contribution to the fields of Asian studies and religious studies as a window into the reality of Muslim diversity that has too often been overshadowed by Western experiences of Muslim minorities or attempts to unfold the puzzle of Islam in China. Hong Kong is a world in itself, and its religious life has been long neglected by scholars. This book makes the everyday experiences of Muslim residents in this city available for comparative purposes and it opens numerous opportunities for further research."
    — 

    Chiara Formichi’s review of my book “Islam in Hong” in the current issue of Asian Anthropology.

    Professor Formichi provides a very well balanced and insightful overview of the text.